History of the Partnership

Overview

History of the Partnership

Founded in 1997, the CCS Partnership was created as a vehicle for the three partnering associations (the California State Association of Counties (CSAC), the California School Boards Association (CSBA), and the League of California Cities (League) to identify common issues, discuss mutual challenges and explore alternative strategies.

An important element of what the CCS Partnership does is convening the leadership of the three partner associations through the structure of the CCS Leadership Council.  The regular gathering of the officers and executives of the partner associations is an opportunity for city, county and school board leaders to get to know each other to build mutual understanding and trust.  This affords officials the opportunity to learn and understand broader issues facing three kinds of local government agencies and the potential for finding common means to address challenges and work collaboratively.

CCS Partnership was a separate non-profit until 2015, when it became a project of the Institute for Local Government under the umbrella of ILG’s Collaboration and Partnerships program. CCS Partnership’s Leadership Council remains an important asset in guiding discussion and delivery of quality materials and resources to inspire, educate and serve local officials and staff of cities, counties and schools.

The three partner associations make an annual commitment to support the organization’s core functions including staff support to the Leadership Council and development of resources and materials, as well as implementation of grant-funded projects.

General

Connecting Local Government Association Leaders

An important element of what the CCS Partnership does is convening the leadership of the three partner associations through the structure of the CCS board of directors.  The thought has been that the regular gathering of the officers and executives of the partnering associations are an opportunity for city, county and school board leaders to get to know each other to build mutual understanding and trust.  This creates the possibility of broader understanding of the issues facing the three kinds of local government and the potential for finding common means to address them.

General

Areas of Effort

In determining what kinds of programmatic issues to pursue funding for, CCS has identified its mission as follows:

“to improve the conditions of children, families and communities at the local level by promoting and encouraging coordination, integration and increased efficiency of local services and joint facilities use among cities, counties and schools in all California communities.”

 Highlights of CCS’ efforts in the past include:

Commands